TÉLÉCHARGER ALBUM XTREME BACHATA GRATUIT

It is clear the two men have many commonalities and are friends, as they confess their emotional vulnerability to the intense passion they feel for the women they are courting. The style they are singing in is bachata. Given the easy familiarity between the two men, their shared vernacular language and fashion sense, is it an intra-racial dialogue between two black friends? Or is it an inter-racial dialogue between individuals with entirely different understandings of race and their racial identity? What are the implications of the images conveyed in this video to historical constructions of Dominican notions of racial identity? As the genre was transformed into a cherished symbol of Dominican authenticity, its popularity eventually surpassed the merengue orquestas that for so long had been imagined as the quintessential musical symbol of Dominican-ness 3.

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It is clear the two men have many commonalities and are friends, as they confess their emotional vulnerability to the intense passion they feel for the women they are courting.

The style they are singing in is bachata. Given the easy familiarity between the two men, their shared vernacular language and fashion sense, is it an intra-racial dialogue between two black friends?

Or is it an inter-racial dialogue between individuals with entirely different understandings of race and their racial identity? What are the implications of the images conveyed in this video to historical constructions of Dominican notions of racial identity?

As the genre was transformed into a cherished symbol of Dominican authenticity, its popularity eventually surpassed the merengue orquestas that for so long had been imagined as the quintessential musical symbol of Dominican-ness 3. Bachata became particularly popular among second generation Dominican immigrants because it offered a powerful way to stay emotionally connected to their ancestral homeland. Their perceived blackness was confirmed by the inner city neighborhoods in which Dominican immigrants took up residence, alongside other poor people of color, especially Puerto Ricans many of whom were dark skinned as well and African Americans.

Hoffnung-Garskof found that relationships between African Americans and Puerto Ricans, who had lived in New York for decades, were easier than with the Dominican newcomers, who were often perceived as unsophisticated hicks.

Some argue that the migration process and the experience of a racial system different from the one they were socialized into causes a shift in Dominican perceptions of self and other—and, therefore, of Dominican identity. In short, they are fluid and malleable, and they respond to context.

Ambiguity is invoked in the first place because of the various and competing ideological codes that frame blackness, whiteness, and indigeneity in the Americas […]. But first, some background. Beginning in the , rural migrants seeking economic opportunity in the capital city of Santo Domingo brought with them a taste for long popular guitar-based styles such as Cuban boleros and guarachas and Mexican rancheras, as well as for the domestic guitar-based Dominican merengue.

Repertoires whose songs had once been vehicles for melodramatic expressions of romantic love and its sufferings were expanded with songs whose lyrics were blatantly sexual and often misogynistic. The newer style resonated with destitute urban migrants because it articulated the anxieties associated with the loss of traditional patterns of marriage, courtship and gender relationships being experienced by under- and unemployed men spending more and more time in bars and brothels rather than at home or at work.

In the s the term began to be used to deliberately demean the music and its fans by associating them with vulgarity, coarseness, and lack of refinement. While some Dominicans settled in Northeastern cities such as Boston and Lawrence, Massachusetts and Providence, Rhode Island, the majority of them put their roots down in New York City, where by they constituted Transplanted and touring Dominican bachateros such as Joe Veras, Raulín Rodríguez, and Luis Vargas found they could make good money—indeed, much better money than in the Dominican Republic—performing in neighborhood clubs throughout New York, as well as other cities with Dominican communities along the Northeastern corridor.

The stars stay in New York two months at a time, working doubles and triples a night. It was inevitable that young Dominicans born or raised in New York would synthesize the two aesthetics in ways that would simultaneously express their identities as urban New Yorkers and as the children of Dominican immigrants. Their debut album, Generation Next released in , was titled in English, and the album cover image presented the group posed in front of a New York City apartment building in what their intended fans would easily understand as an urban attitude, conveying emphatically that this group was not from the island but from New York, and that it was offering something different from its Dominican antecedents.

This essay on urban bachata in the United States was intended to They grew up in the hip-hop generation, and the way Lenny Santos uses his guitar has some of those influences from sampled electronic music. He really revolutionized the style of guitar playing. They also used Spanglish and English in all their subsequent recordings, although never in equal proportions.

They avoided, however, the edgier narratives characteristic of hip-hop lyrics celebrating the harsher aspects of street culture such as drug use, violence, and promiscuous sex. In they sold out four Madison Square Garden concerts—triple the number of tickets sold for a Lady Gaga concert opening at the same time. Unfortunately it was very hard with the styles I was doing, it was very tough, because not everyone is ready for a certain change. There were times when we went to perform and there were people screaming and lashing out words that were really rough and tough to hear.

Nonetheless, despite their imprecisions, changes in the meanings of such musical categories at particular points in time can indicate shifts in the collective popular imagination.

In any party with young Latins, you play music and they begin to dance. King himself, introducing or re-introducing millions of Latino viewers to the venerable African American rhythm and blues singer. The following year Anthony Santos—who by then was going by the single name, Romeo—released his first solo album, Formula Vol. The experience of Domenic Marte provides another example of how urban bachateros try to negotiate their urban and their island-oriented identities.

My second guitar player, he comes from that urban world of music as well. My programmer, he only knows hip-hop […]. What you do bring in, is you want a real, pure Dominican from the Dominican Republic, that came here and would know how to play bongos, or the güira, all the percussion. Romeo may look and talk like his African American friend Usher, but it soon becomes clear that they are different as the video proceeds to construct subtle cultural distinctions. In short, Grace maintains an ambiguous racial identity while using language and culture to underscore her ethnic identity as Dominican.

But Latinos themselves also employed these same terms. Clearly, the crucial distinction was not location of residence both groups were urban New Yorkers , nor race both were Afrodescendants , but rather, language, as a proxy for culture. Diddy and Lil Wayne, as well as with the Cuban American rapper Pitbull, with mixed success, but the dialogues taking place between urban African American artists and urban bachateros have not been unfolding on an equal playing field.

Music industry personnel have taken note. For this reason, in the online site LatinRapper. Contemporary urban bachateros thus enjoy numerically larger, more culturally diverse, and more geographically dispersed Latino audiences than they had at the turn of the millenium, and in seeking to appeal to them, they have a wider range of aesthetic and cultural—and identity—choices at their disposal.

Throughout the s and s, when Dominicans were pouring into New York, their longerestablished Puerto Rican peers were well accustomed to interacting in the same socio-cultural spaces and practices as African Americans, and had long engaged in musical exchanges with African Americans, embracing whatever new styles were in fashion, but at the same time, retaining their cultural distinctiveness as Puerto Ricans. Puerto Rican reggaeton, in contrast, which was coalescing in Puerto Rico at around the same time as urban bachata was emerging in New York, remains a primarily Spanish language genre.

I found no evidence that urban bachata, unlike reggaeton, has been considered a black music. I was also unable to find urban bachata lyrics that engage with issues of race or racism—unlike hip-hop and reggaeton, both of which frequently address these themes. Emphasizing the distinctiveness of Dominican music and culture over a shared diasporan identity can be interpreted as a sort of sonic flag-waving, in which Dominicans assert their cultural distinctiveness within an English language popular music landscape dominated by African American styles—while at the same time, distinguishing themselves from other Latinos and their musics.

If bachata is considered by its performers and fans no matter what their skin tone might be to be an urban music i. Moreover, the racially and aesthetically ambiguous category of Latin music—which urban bachata will remain a part of as long as bachateros continue to sing in Spanish—includes many styles of African derivation.

Indeed, for many people in the United States, the category of Latin music is still practically if inaccurately synonymous with Afro-Caribbean dance musics such as mambo, salsa and merengue

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# Guides & Tops

On Tuesday and Thursday there is salsa, kizomba and bachata music while Wednesday nights are reserved for rock. Salsa Cuban and Porto Rican fans, beginners and the more proficient won't want to miss the opportunity to dance at La Pachanga from Tuesday to Sunday. Les mardis et jeudis soirs bougent aux rythmes de la salsa, kizomba et bachata tandis que les mercredis soirs sont réservés au rock. Débutants comme confirmés, les amoureux de salsa cubaine, portoricaine peuvent se déhancher à La Pachanga du mardi au dimanche. Baby, all your ringtones are bachata music. Bébé, toutes tes sonneries de téléphone sont des airs de cha-cha

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Albums et singles de Danny-D (Xtreme)

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